KC Gardens

How to pick a ripe melon

Ripe muskmelon

Tip of the Week

K-State Research and Extension is fortunate to have Ward Upham on staff. Ward staffs the horticulture department’s rapid response center. Unfortunately his job requires him to be chained to a desk during the growing season in order to assist Extension agents from across the state with questions. He also writes a number of informational articles. One of his weekly tips says it all when picking a ripe melon. Read more on this topic from Ward.

Telling when a melon is ready to be harvested can be a challenge, or it may be quite easy. It all depends on the type of melon. Let’s start with the easy one. Muskmelons are one of those crops that tell you when they are ready to be picked. This can help you not only harvest melons at the correct time but also choose good melons when shopping. As a melon ripens, a layer of cells around the stem softens so the melon detaches easily from the vine. This is called “slipping” and will leave a dish-shaped scar at the point of stem attachment. When harvesting melons, put a little pressure where the vine attaches to the fruit. If ripe, it will release or “slip.”

When choosing a melon from those that have already been harvested, look for a clean, dish-shaped scar. Also, ripe melons have a pleasant, musky aroma if the melons are at room temperature (not refrigerated).

Watermelons can be more difficult and growers often use several techniques to tell when to harvest. 1. Look for the tendril that attaches at the same point as the melon to dry and turn brown. On some varieties this will need to be completely dried before the watermelon is ripe. On others it will only need to be in the process of turning brown.

  1. The surface of a ripening melon develops a surface roughness (sometimes called “sugar bumps”) near the base of the fruit.

  2. Ripe watermelons normally develop a yellow color on the “ground spot” when ripe. This is the area of the melon that contacts the ground.

Honeydew melons are the most difficult to tell when they are ripe because they do not “slip” like muskmelons. Actually, there is one variety that does slip called Earli-dew, but it is the exception to the rule. Ripe honeydew melons become soft on the flower end of the fruit. The “flower end” is the end opposite where the stem attaches. Also, honeydews should change to a light or yellowish color when ripe, but this varies with variety.

Thanks Ward, I know when I am shopping for a cantaloupe or muskmelon at the grocery store I always look for the stem slip. My wife always wonders why the melons I pick tend to be better flavored. The trick is knowing the secrets to success.

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